Expression

The Caps Lockup

The Caps Lockup isn't a replacement for any of the core Lockups, but more so a different way to express objects and products in a less corporate fashion.

The Caps Lockup

The Caps Lockup is an exciting use of our identity typeface, EF Circular, that draws its style from the standard Product Lockup DNA. However, it isn’t a replacement for any of the other Lockups, but should be seen as a different way to express objects and products in a less corporate fashion.

Left-aligned version.

Center-aligned version.

The primary way to use the Caps Lockup is for product names. Most of EF’s product names are so descriptive and therefore can be a headline in their own right.

There is also a case use for labelling things, and being playful with copywriting for the Caps Lockup.

Left-aligned and Center-aligned

The first and more academic way of using the Caps Lockup is to left-align the typography. It creates a neat, organised layout, and works well in editorially led designs in print or online.

    

Example: Languages Abroad (left-aligned).

The second and more adventurous way of using the Caps Lockup is to center-align the typography. It creates a bold, impactful version of the element, ideal for making statements for posters.

    

Example: Explore America (center-aligned).

The Caps Lockup & the EF Logo

The relationship with the EF logo and the text is important. The EF logo must always be present on the same canvas as the Caps Lockup, clearly aligned with the text orientation.

    

This diagram shows the size relationship requirements between the cap height of the lettering and the EF Logo.

The second and more adventurous way of using the Caps Lockup is to center-align the typography. It creates a bold, impactful version of the element, ideal for making statements for posters.

    

Align the EF Logo accordingly.

The EF Logo should always be aligned with the orientation of the typography. In the example here, it’s centered; when the orientation is left, the logo will sit in line on the left on the canvas.

There are no restrictions for the distance between the EF Logo and the Caps Lockup, as formats change between print, video and digital. As long as they are both present with a visible relationship, this expression element can be used.

Labeling

Another way the Caps Lockup can be used is to clearly label items. Labelling stems from an academic, utilitarian place, becoming a quick and easy way to apply the EF brand identity to anything.

EF / COFFEE CUP

EF / WATER BOTTLE

EF / POSTER

EF / LANYARD

EF / SUITCASE

EF / NOTEBOOK

Not only does labelling things present a very functional, utilitarian aesthetic, but it also makes that thing an EF thing. Instead of just being a notebook, or a water bottle, it becomes an EF notebook, or an EF water bottle.

This distinction puts EF as a company alongside these things that are associated with academics and adventure, and makes it completely normal — even more so ownable for EF.

Customer swag

One of the things EF does in abundance is customer swag. The majority of the time, the products we make for the customer are in a post-sale scenario, that is, they know who we are already. So with that in mind, the Caps Lockup becomes the perfect design tool to create some great-looking items.

We can afford to inject humor into our copywriting.

For wearable items, the connection to the EF brand is much more intimate. In these cases, we can move the EF Logo to the back of the neck (for instance), or to a woven label towards the bottom.

A difficult thing to achieve is to create things that people want. It’s really easy to plaster the EF Logo across anything and ship it. However this doesn’t necessarily endear the item to anyone. By utilizing elements like the Caps Lockup and putting more thought into our design decisions, we can create aesthetically pleasing swag that our customers will want to keep.

Product family

As with the Product Lockups, by using this typographic style, all products are brought together in a uniform and consistent way. When looking at a wide range of products in this style, it shows how well EF Circular works in bringing an academic and adventurous aesthetic across all of EF.

Elements such as the Caps Lockup represent an exciting turning point in EF’s visual language. It means EF is at a point where we don’t necessarily have to rely on just using the EF Logo every time we want to communicate a message.

Example: Pre-sale & Post-sale

The type treatment should not be used in a pre-sale context for the following touch points:

Brochures, adverts, flyers, sales posters, business cards, letterheads, signage, physical sites, e-mail marketing, websites or social media.

    

An example of a pre-sale flyer for EF High School Exchange Year, which utilizes the print Product Lockup.

This asset is something that should be used for post-sale circumstances and customer swag only. This is because at that point, the customer has sufficiently interacted with the EF and will be familiar with our identity, therefore we can afford to be more relaxed with how we communicate product names and objects.

    

An example of a post-sale folder for EF High School Exchange Year, which utilizes the Caps Lockup.